Quarantine Recipe: Ginty’s Chicken Wings

April 23, 2020
wings
Categories: 

Ginty’s Chicken Wing Recipe

By now you’re looking for something different to cook at home.  It’s been a few weeks of quarantine and you’ve run through all your go-to recipes.  The next time you mask up and head to the grocery store pick up some chicken wings.  There was no college basketball tournament and all the bars, including sports bars, are closed so there is a surplus of Chicken Wings.  Prices have also significantly dropped — from nearly $2 per pound during February to nearly $1 per pound, the cheapest in more than nine years.
 

Grab a bunch of wings for the family, figure about 6-8 per person.  Wings are usually sold together, the “drum” and the “flat” are connected.  So total the average skinny guy like me can eat 10 wings. You have to split or cut them.  Get a good knife and find the joint and cut the wings apart.  Cut that little extra piece off and junk it.  No meat on that.  

 

wings ginty

 

Wait, why would you use a recipe from a guy who talks on the radio?  Because I’m originally from Buffalo, NY the birthplace of Buffalo wings.  I grew up on those things.  You can go to any bar or restaurant in Western New York and get good wings.  I’ve been in New Orleans for over 20 years and have tried wings from everywhere and they just aren’t even close!  First, you don’t bread or batter your chicken wings.  NEVER. You’re wasting your time.  

 

Here’s the deal.

 

Prepare your wings like I said above.  Then get your vegetable or canola oil.  You probably have peanut oil laying around somewhere from the last time you fried a turkey.  That’s what I use.    How much oil to use?  Depends on how many wings you want to fry.  I do about 3 pounds of chicken wings at a time.  Don’t put too many wings in at once or oil will get cool and the wings won’t cook right.  Use a good pot and dump in your oil then get it hot to 375 degrees.  Then carefully place your dry, never frozen raw chicken wings in the oil. You’ll need 12 to 15 minutes per batch of wings.  You want them crispy, not burned or a nice golden-brown color.  Take them out when ready, drain off excess oil.  Throw them on a plate with a paper towel.  If you want to use an air fryer go for it, I find it just doesn’t do the job. 

 

The Sauce.

 

Grab your hot sauce.  Frank’s Red Hot, Louisiana, Tabasco or whatever you like.  

For 30 wings you want:

1/2 cup Hot sauce (Frank's is the brand used in Buffalo)

8 tablespoons unsalted butter (or margarine).  I use regular margarine.  

Melt the butter and mix well with the hot sauce.  Pour into a large bowl, dump in your freshly cooked wings, mix around until the wings are completely coated and dripping. 

Some people like to add this to the mix:       

1 1/2 tablespoons white vinegar

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/8 teaspoon garlic powder

1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce. 

Salt (to taste)

If you want hotter wings then simply use hotter sauce or use a little less butter.   Serve with Celery, bleu cheese, a wedge of lettuce, French fries and some beers.  

Who invented Buffalo Chicken Wings?  (From https://anchorbar.com)

On a Friday night in 1964, Dominic Bellissimo was tending bar at the now famous Anchor Bar Restaurant in Buffalo, NY. Late that evening, a group of Dominic’s friends arrived at the bar with ravenous appetites. Dominic asked his mother, Teressa, to prepare something for his friends to eat. They looked like chicken wings, a part of the chicken that usually went into the stock pot for soup.Teressa had deep fried the wings and flavored them with a secret sauce. The wings were an instant hit and it didn’t take long for people to flock to the bar to experience this new taste sensation. From that evening on, Buffalo Wings became a regular part of the menu at the Anchor Bar.The phenomenon created in 1964 by Teressa Bellissimo has spread across the globe. Although many have tried to duplicate Buffalo Wings, the closely guarded secret recipe is what makes Frank & Teressa’s the proclaimed “Best Wings in the World.”

https://anchorbar.com